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Archive for the ‘Bengal Archeology’ Category

Jatar Deul and finally the Horse Race

May 3, 2017 3 comments

Horse Race at Jatar Deul

Kankandighi, Raidighi, 24 Parganas (South)

Also see: Jatar Deul and the Illusive Horse Race

It was the second day of the Bengali new year 1420 (16 April 2011), my friend Amitabha Gupta and I headed for the Jatar Deul to witness the horse race. After a 4 + hour journey via train, auto and motor van we finally made it to Jatar Deul only to be informed that the horse race has been postponed to 25 Baikash (9 May) because of Elections.

Galloping past cheering crowd, horse race at Jatar Deul

Galloping past cheering crowd, horse race at Jatar Deul

Amitabha and I decided to retrace out steps back to Jatar Deul for the illusive horse race. On 9thMay we repeated our 5 hours long journey only to be informed that the race was called off due to unofficial reasons. (Also see: Jatar Deul and the Illusive Horse Race)

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Tribeni, Mosque & Dargah of Jafar Khan Gazi

December 1, 2016 Leave a comment

Tribeni, Mosque & Dargah of Jafar Khan Gazi

Hooghly, West Bengal

Triben generally refers to the confluence of the three rivers Ganga, Yamuna and the illusive Saraswati near Allahabad. But the Hooghly district of West Bengal also houses another Tribeni, where the Bhagarati or Hooghly River disintegrates into three branches. The three branches are Hooghly, Sarswati and Jamuna (Kanchrapara Khal).

tribeni-1

Zafar Khan Gazi Masjid, Tribeni, Hooghly

So like the Prayag near Allabahad the Tribeni of Hooghly has also attracte pilgrims for centuries and is mentioned in ancient Bengali literature like the Mansamangal and Chandimangal.

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Pundooah (Hooghly), Minar and Masjid

November 13, 2013 16 comments

Pundooah (Hooghly)

Minar (Tower) and Masjid (Mosque)

Pundooah, the name normally refers to the twin city of Gour, now in Malda, which was once the capital of Bengal. Much closer to Calcutta, in the district of Hooghly lie another Pundooah. Both these places contain interesting historical relics.

Pundooah Minar and Bais Darwaza Masjid, Pundooah. Hooghly

Pundooah Minar and Bais Darwaza Masjid, Pundooah. Hooghly

The smaller version, at Hooghly, contains a five-storied minar (tower) and the ruins of an ancient mosque. It is just 61 km from Howrah and can be reached by the Burdwan Local via main line in one and half hour.

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Chandraketugarh & Khana Mihirer Dhipi

September 25, 2013 17 comments

Chandraketugarh & Khana Mihirer Dhipi

~ Fort of the Mythical King & Mound of the Legendary Mathematicians ~

In 1907 a young Bengali archaeologist made an extensive survey of the Berachampa region near Barasat. He submitted a report and suggested an extensive excavation. A decade and half later the he made history by excavating the ruins of Mohenjo daro. Yes its Rakhal Das Bandyopadhyay!!! But sadly the mound of Chandraketugarh still lies unexcavated even after a century after its discovery.

Khana Mihir er Dhipi (Mound)

Khana Mihir er Dhipi (Mound)

According to archaeologists Chandraketugarh was a prosperous urban settlement that flourished during the 4th century BC to the 12 century AD. The period ranged from the yearly Mauryan to the late Pala rule.

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Dihar ~ Ruined Twin Temples

June 19, 2013 1 comment

Dihar ~ Ruined Twin Temples

Near Bishnupur, Bankura, West Bengal

Also see: Beyond Bishnupur ~ Brick and Stone Temples

Saileswar and Sareswar Temples, Dihar (near Bishnupur), Bankura

Saileswar and Sareswar Temples, Dihar (near Bishnupur), Bankura

Located 8 km from Bishnupur, on the Bishnupur – Sonamukhi highway, the village of Dihar houses two ruined but majestic temples. Both the temples are dedicated to Lord Shiva and are known as Sareswar and Saileswar. A Nandi Bull guards the entrance of Sareswar Temple.

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Asad Uj Jaman’s Collection of Chandraketugarh Artifact

January 16, 2013 1 comment

Boxes Full of History

Asad Uj Jaman’s Collection of Chandraketugarh Artifact

See Also: My blog post on Chandraketugarh and Khana Mihirer Dhipi

One by one the boxes came, ordinary plastic boxes with extraordinary content!!!!! small terracotta piece few wrapped in cotton wool and few others in newspapers but most of them bare, but strangely these pieces dates back far beyond the days of Christ.

Asad uj Jamans's collection of Chandraketugarh Artifacts

Asad uj Jaman’s collection of Chandraketugarh Artifacts

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Mahisasuramardini on Bengal Terracotta

October 3, 2012 14 comments

Mahisasuramardini on Bengal Terracotta

~ A compilation on Mahisasuramardani panels on Bengal Terracotta Temples ~

See also: Mahabharata on Bengal Terracotta

Mythology presents goddess Durga as the genius of destruction springing into existence on occasion to fight out destroy the evil forces jeopardising the values and virtues of the earth and also posing threats to god’s creation.

Mahisasurmardini, one of the most popular form of goddesses Durga, is described as a slayer of the bull – shaped monster Mahisasur, who challenged the ocean and the Himalayas. Mahishasur is said to be like a roaring cloud and regarded as a Danava and Asura. Mahishasur was like a storm capable of defeating the in battle, till such time goddess caused his slain.

The most popular form of Durga appearing on on Bengal Terracotta Temple is the episode of slaying the buffalo demon (Mahishasur). Durga riding her vehicle, lion is mostly accompanied by her daughters and sons, namely Lakshmi, Saraswati, Kartik and Ganesh.

The Mahisasuramardini motif is common on many of the late medieval brick temples of Bengal, irrespective of the worshiped deity to which the temple belongs.

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