Home > Delhi, Delhi Architecture, Delhi History, General > Adilabad Fort & Nai ka Kot, unknown forts next to Tughlaqabad Fort

Adilabad Fort & Nai ka Kot, unknown forts next to Tughlaqabad Fort

Adilabad Fort and Nai ka Kot

Lesser known forts in the shadows Tughlaqabad Fort, Delhi

Although archaeological evidences show that the region around Delhi has been inhabited for over 3000 years but it has been only in the last thousand years Delhi has been the stronghold of north India.

A panoramic view of the exterior of Adilabad Fort, Delhi
A panoramic view of the exterior of Adilabad Fort, Delhi

It was only in middle of the 11th century, during the Tomar rule, Delhi got its first fortified city the Lal Kot. Later Prithiviraj Chauhan (Reign 1170 – 92) expended the citadel and renamed it Qila Rai Pithora.

Nai ka Kot towers above the shipping containers, Delhi

Nai ka Kot towers above the shipping containers, Delhi

In 1192 Prithiviraj Chauhan was ousted by Muhammad of Ghur to establish Muslim rule in Delhi, which would continue for the next six and half century. But it was only during the reign of Alauddin Khalji (Reign 1296 – 1316) Delhi got its first Muslim citadel at Siri.

Southern gate of Nai ka Kot

Southern gate of Nai ka Kot

Later Ghiyasuddin Tughluq (Reign 1312 – 25), the founder Tughluq Dynasty, built his massive citadel Tughluqabad about 8 km east of Siri.

Ghiyasuddin’s son and successor Muhammad bin Tughluq (Reign 1325 – 51) built the fourth walled city of Delhi.

The fort covered the area between Qila Rai Pithora and Siri and was named Jahanpanaha, meaning Refuge of the World.

Apart from his fortified city Muhammad bin Tughluq went on to built two minor forts just south of his father’s mighty citadel of Tughluqabad. Today this two minor forts of Nai ka Kot and Adilabad lies in the shadows of its more famed counterpart and is hardly visited by tourists.

Panoramic views of the interior of Nai ka Kot, Delhi

Panoramic views of the interior of Nai ka Kot, Delhi

To explore Nai ki  Kot and Adilabad it is best to take the Metro Violet Line and get down at the Tughlukabad station. Take a auto from the station and travel towards Mehrauli along the Mehrauli – Badarpur highway.

Steps leading to the Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Steps leading to the Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Before you reach the Tughlaqabad Fort, which will be on your right, you will pass through a open space storing shipping containers. Just behind the colourfull containers and on a top of a small hill, is the Nai ka Kot.

South Eastern Gate and Bastion, Adilabad Fort

South Eastern Gate and Bastion, Adilabad Fort

Nai ki Kot, literally meaning the Barber’s fort, was built by Muhammad bin Tughluq, but nothing is known about this 14th century influential  barber.

But dedicating forts to their favourite barbers is nothing uncommon among the royals of Delhi.

In the Humayun’s Tomb complex stands the Barber’s Tomb, probably housing the mortal remains of emperor’s favourite barber.

Get down from the auto and make your way through the colourful containers towards the Nai ka Kot, a small foot paths leads to the forts arched entrance.

Another view of the South East gate of Adilabad, Delhi

Another view of the South East gate of Adilabad, Delhi

The fort lies in utter neglect and is used by the locals to answer their nature’s call, so do watch your step!!! The Nai ka Kot has an arched gate on the south and another gate on the north and no structures have survived within the walled enclosure. 

South East gate of Adilabad from inside the fort

South East gate of Adilabad from inside the fort

Bidding farewell to Nai ka Kot and get back to the Mehrauli – Badarpur Road and continue your walk toward Mehrauli.

Soon on you right, the massive walls and bastions of Tughlaqabad Fort will come into view. Continue your walk as you admire the massiveness of  ancient citadel.

Walk pat the Kaya Maya Ayurvedic Hospital, on your left, and just next to the boundary of the ayurvedic hospital is a open space and beyond the open space is a small hill crowned with the Adilabad Fort.

A dirt road meanders through the open space, which will be probably be converted into a landscaped garden, leads to the foot of the hill. A wide staircase meanders past the massive bastions and leads to the south west gate of Adilabad Fort.

Walls of Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Walls of Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Adilabad, also known as Muhammadabad, was constructed by Muhammad bin Tughluq and was probably constructed after the construction of Jahanpanah, the fourth city of Delhi.

Although much smaller in size than the neighbouring Tughlaqabad Fort, the Adilabad Fort follows a similar plan and can be considered as a scaled down version of Tughluqbad Fort.

The fort is a stark contrast to the neighbouring Nai ki Kot and is remarkably well maintained with landscaped gardens and manicured lawns. A protected monument under the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI), the boards at the entrance of the fort provide the brief history along with the floor plan.

Tree lined walkways inside the Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Tree lined walkways inside the Adilabad Fort, Delhii

Nothing much have survived in the interior of the fort all that remains are the massive walls topped with battlements and punctured with massive bastions. Apart from the south east gate, through which the fort is approachable, there is another gate on the south west corner.

Walls topped with battlements and landscaped gardens inside Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Walls topped with battlements and landscaped gardens inside Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Nothing much remains of the inner enclosure, which once housed the royal palace, but the entire area within the walls is beautifully landscaped with tree line walkways. The Adilabad Fort was linked with the Tughlaqabad fort by a causeway, but only traces of its remains today.

Panoramic views of the interiors of Adilabad Fort, Delhi

Panoramic views of the interiors of Adilabad Fort, Delhi

From the south east gate of Adilabad Fort there are great views of the Ghiyasuddin’s Tomb and behind it rises the massive walls of Tughlaqabad Fort.

Necessary Information:

Nearest Metro: Tughlakabad (Violet Line)

Auto: Tughlakabad Metro to Nai ki Kot (about 7 km, Rs 50). Please mention Tughlaqabad, the auto driver may not be aware of Nai ki Kot. Get down when you see the shipping containers on your left

Note: Ghiyasuddin’s Tomb and Tughlaqabad can be covered in the same day

 

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  1. August 8, 2017 at 12:27 PM

    This article will definitely be a great help to those who want know more about Adilabad Fort.

  2. August 11, 2017 at 1:30 PM

    Beautiful & Historical site !!

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