Home > Andhra Pradesh, FAM (Familiarization) Tour, FAM Trip, General, Hyderabad and Warangal FAM > Ghanpur Group of Temples, Ghanpur (Mulug), Warangal, AP

Ghanpur Group of Temples, Ghanpur (Mulug), Warangal, AP

Ghanpur Group of Temples

The Hidden Gem of Kakatiya Architecture

See also: FAM (familiarization) tour of Hyderabad and Warangal

Panorama of Ghanpur Group of Temples, Ghanpur (Mulug), Warangal, Anadhra Pradesh (AP)

Panorama of Ghanpur Group of Temples, Ghanpur (Mulug), Warangal, Anadhra Pradesh

The scattered ruins of the Ghanpur Temple complex, locally known as Kotagullu, looks like a huge open air museum, with crumbling structures and scattered sculptures.

The Main Shiva Shrine, Ghanpur  Group of Temples

The Main Shiva Shrine, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Although lesser known than the nearby famed Ramappa Temple of Palampet, the ruined Ghanpur  Temple Complex should be a must visit from tourist visiting Warangal.

The Ghanpur group of temples were probably constructed by Ganapati Deva of Kakatiya dynasty in the early 13th century.

The Kakatiyas became a dominant power in Andhra Pradesh at the same time as the Hoysalas emerged in Karnatak.

Both the Hoysalas and Kakatiya dynasties were great patrons of architecture with very similar architectural style, leading to the construction of several temples, spread over the modern day Karnataka and Andhra Pragesh.

The Main Shiva Shrine, Ghanpur  Group of Temples

The Main Shiva Shrine, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Ghanpur, once the citadel of power of the mighty Kakatiya dynasty, was plundered during the invasion of the Giyasuddin Tughlaq in 1323.

In spite of the severe damage the temple survived and even after years of human neglect and nature’s toll the spectacular Ghanpur Group of Temples can still be seen to this day.

Located about 65 km South West of Warangal the Ghanpur Group of Temples is restored by the Andhra Pradesh State Archeology Department.

The dilapidated temple complex, consists of 22 structures, of different shape and size, enclosed within a doubled walled complex.

Smaller Shiva Temples, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Smaller Shiva Temples, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Sadly the entrance of the Gahnpur Group of Temples is not marked wit a board, depicting the brief history of the structures.

Six small Shiva shrines welcomes one to the ruined complex. In spite of the ruined state the Ghanpur Group of temples seems to a symphony of scattered stones.

The main Shiva Temple at the centre is the prime attraction. Built on a high star shaped platform the roof of the temple have long collapsed.

A sole Nandi Bull, at the centre of the courtyard, remains the only witness of the glorious days of the Kakatiya Dynasty. The main shrine also contains bracket figures of yalis and mandakinis but they lack the grace and beauty of their counterpart in Ramappa.

Sandstone Freeze, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Sandstone Freeze, Ghanpur Group of Temples

The East facing main shrine also contains exotic freezes, including a intricately curved granite door frame leading to the inner sanctum. The walls contain several sandstone freezes of elephant and lotus.

The main Shiva shrine is flanked on either side by two structures, to the North lies another Shiva shrine and to the South lies a Mandapa.

The Shiva temple on the North follows the same plan as the main shrine but much smaller in size but is more or less intact.

Shiva Temple, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Shiva Temple, Ghanpur Group of Temples

The structure on the South is a Mandapa. The roof of the mandapa has survived the test of time and remains intricately balanced on tumbling pillars.

Mandapa, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Mandapa, Ghanpur Group of Temples

Each of the pillar consists of three section, consisting of square, octagonal and circular parts. Some of the squared section contains sculptured panels.

Two sculptures of Shiva and Vishnu, probably excavated from the temple complex, stands guard at the entrance of the Mandapa.

The complex also contains several other structures, including the six minor Shiva Temples at the entrance.

The entire complex is littered with large slabs of sandstones, severely of which contain intricately curved freezes.

Orientation:

Special Thanks:

This trip was part of a FAM (familirazation) tour of Hyderabad and Warangal conducted by Andhra Paradesh Tourism Development Corporation (APTDC). Special thanks to:

  • Kalyani, Consultant Sales and Marketing, APTDC
  • Dr. P. Jogi Naidu, Dy. Director (Retd.), Archeology and Museums, AP
  • Kiran Mehata and Sunil Vidayanatahn my fellow FAM tour participant
  • Santosh our driver
  • Haritah Hotels
  • All the staff of APTDC

  1. February 5, 2014 at 3:43 AM

    So informative..thanks for sharing 🙂

  2. February 5, 2014 at 10:35 AM

    Really nice🙂

  3. February 6, 2014 at 11:16 PM

    Didn’t know about this place when I visited Warangal.😦
    Now I know!

    • February 13, 2014 at 9:47 PM

      Indrani Ghanpur Group of Temples is not on the popular list of tourist spots from Warangal. I was there on a FAM tour of APTDC it was very well planned.

  4. Kalyani
    February 9, 2014 at 7:18 AM

    Well written and the beautiful pictures which gave more info to correlate the article Rangan Datta!

    • February 13, 2014 at 9:48 PM

      Thanks Kalyani for the wonderful FAM tour, with out your help the article would have never materialized.

  5. October 28, 2015 at 4:59 PM

    Great job guys !! Excellent sculpture on rocks ,good to know our history !!
    Many people are interested to visit/explore except the politicians who has to spend some money to develop the place and educate future generations !!

    I have visited Ramappa and pakala lake twice,dont even heard of this great place and its historical importance 😦

    • October 28, 2015 at 8:02 PM

      Thanks Srikant, the Ramappa, Ghanpur Group of Temples and the 1000 pillar temple are great work of architecture but sadly the are not properly promoted.

      Next time, please do visit the Ghanpur Group of Temples.

  6. Sumanth
    March 12, 2016 at 6:40 PM

    Please also mention the tank Ganapasamudram in the same village and probably third biggest in Warangal dist.

  1. January 24, 2016 at 8:49 PM

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