Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Raj Bhavan’

Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photowalk

October 17, 2012 2 comments

Scott Kelby’s Worldwide Photowalk

13 October 2012, Calcutta (Kolkata)

See Also: My blog post on Scott Kelby’s Photowalk 2013, Calcutta (Kolkata)

About Scott Kelby:

Kelby is editor and publisher of Photoshop User and Layers magazines, president and co-founder of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP) and is president of Kelby Media Group, an Oldsmar, Florida-based software training, education, and publishing firm.

Scott Kelby's Photowalk, Calcutta (Kolkata) Group Photo (Photo Courtsey: Manjit Singh Hoonjan)

Scott Kelby’s Photowalk, Calcutta (Kolkata) Group Photo (Photo Courtsey: Manjit Singh Hoonjan)

Kelby is a photographer, designer, and the award-winning author of more than 50 books, including Photoshop Down & Dirty Tricks, The Photoshop CS3 Book for Digital Photographers, The Photoshop Channels Book, Photoshop Classic Effects, The Adobe Photoshop Lightroom Book for Digital Photographers, The iPod Book, The Digital Photography Book, and The iPhone Book.

Read more…

PHOTO PUBLICATION – III

September 14, 2011 1 comment

PHOTO PUBLICATION – III

JET WINGS

AUGUST 2011

Three of my photographs on Calcutta (kolkata) Architecture was published in the article titled “Stories within Walls” by Partha Mukherjee & Priyanka Mukherjee in the Jet Wings (In flight magazine of Jet Airways) October 2011 issue.

Pages of Jet Wings with my photos

Pages of Jet Wings with my photos

My three published photos:

  • General Post Office (GPO), Calcutta (Kolkata)
  • St. Andrew’s Kirk (Church), Calcutta (kolkata)
  • Raj Bhavan Gate, Calcutta (Kolkata)
General Post Office (GPO), Calcutta (Kolkata)
General Post Office (GPO), Calcutta (Kolkata)

General Post Office (GPO), Calcutta (Kolkata)

General Post Office (GPO) is one of the famous landmark of the city of Calcutta (Kolkata). Built in 1864 the majestic building was designed by Walter B. Grenvile.

Built at the sight of the old Fort William the stairs on the Eastern end of the building still contains the almost invisible brass plate marking the boundary of the old fort. The old Fort William was destroyed by Shiraj – ud – Daulah in 1756.

The majestic building has two wings supported by Ionic – Corinthian pillars and is crowned with a towering dome.

Today it operates as the chief post office of West Bengal and contains a Philately Department and a Postal Museum.

More photos of Calcutta (Kolkata) Architecture.

St Andrew’s Kirk (Church), Calcutta (Kolkata)

St. Andrews Kirk (Church), Clacutta (Kolkata)

St. Andrews Kirk (Church), Clacutta (Kolkata)

Located at the Dalhousie Square St. Andrew’s Kirk (Kirk means Scottish Church) is the first Scottish Church of Calcutta

(Kolkata). The milk white St. Andrew’s Church, with its withe steeple crowned with a black weather cock, stands next to the Writers’ Building.

With the initiative of Scottish man Dr James Bryce, the Scottish community of Calcutta (Kolkata) started building their own church in 1815. Completed in 1818 the St. Andrew’s Church was designed by M/s Burn, Currie & Co. and its steeple was higher than that of the then Anglican Cathedral of Calcutta St. John’s Church, much to the annoyance of Bishop Middleton.

Today the St. Andrew’s Church stands as an oasis of peace in Calcutta’s busiest square.

Another view of St. Andrew’s Kirk (Church), Calcutta (Kolkata)

Raj Bhaban, Calcutta (Kolkata)

“without doubt the finest Government House occupied by the representative of any Sovereign or Government in the world.” Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India (1898 – 1905)

Raj Bhaban Gate, Calcutta (Kolkata)

Raj Bhaban Gate, Calcutta (Kolkata)

Before 1799 the Governor General resided in a rented house, called Bukimham House, located in the same location. It was in 1799 the then Governor General of India, Lord Wellesley, took the initiative of building a palace, because he believed that India should be ruled form a palace and not from a country house.

After 4 years construction was complete at a colossal cost of 63,291 pounds (about 3.8 million pounds in today’s estimate). Wellesley was charged for misusing of Company’s fund and was finally recalled back to England in 1805.

Designed by Capt. Charles Wyatt and on the lines of the Curzon’s family mansion of the Keddleston Hall of Derbyshire, the Raj Bhavan follows a Neoclassical style with distinct Baroque overtones. In a strange coincidence, a 100 years after its construction started, the most illustrious son of the Curzon family, George Nathaniel Curzon came to occupy the Raj Bhavan as the Viceroy of India.

Today Raj Bhavan is the official residence of the Governor of Bengal and one of the leading landmarks of Calcutta (Kolkata).

Raj Bhavan Calcutta (Kolkata) from North Gate

More Photo Publication

Raj Bhavan, Calcutta (Kolkata)

“Contiguous to the Esplanade is the Government House, a superb edifice, approached by four colossal gates emblazoned with the Britannic Arms.”

Thomas & William Daniell, British painters, 1810.

“without doubt the finest Government House occupied by the representative of any Sovereign or Government in the world.”

 Lord Curzon, Viceroy of India (1898 – 1905)

Raj Bhaban from North Gate

 

In the early nineteenth century Calcutta (Kolkata) was at the height of its golden age. Known as the City of palaces or St. Petersburg of the east, Calcutta (Kolkata) was the richest, largest and the most elegant colonial cities of India.

View of Raj Bhavan from North Gate

It was during this time one of the finest colonial structures of Calcutta (Kolkata) was constructed. Built in 1803 the Government House, now Raj Bhavan served as the official residence of the Governor General of India and later after independence as the official residence of the Governor of Bengal.

Before 1799 the Governor General resided in a rented house, called Bukimham House, located in the same location. It was in 1799 the then Governor General of India, Lord Wellesley, took the initiative of building a palace, because he believed that India should be ruled form a palace and not from a country house.

After 4 years construction was complete at a colossal cost of 63,291 pounds (about 3.8 million pounds in today’s estimate). Wellesley was charged for misusing of Company’s fund and was finally recalled back to England in 1805.

Designed by Capt. Charles Wyatt and on the lines of the Curzon’s family mansion of the Keddleston Hall of Derbyshire, the Raj Bhavan follows a Neoclassical style with distinct Baroque overtones. In a strange coincidence, a 100 years after its construction started, the most illustrious son of the Curzon family, George Nathaniel Curzon came to occupy the Raj Bhavan as the Viceroy of India.

View of Raj Bhavan from South Gate

Since the days of Lord Wellesley the Raj Bhavan had undergone several changes. In 1860s the Viceroy Lord Elgin added the metallic Dome. Lord Curzon brought electricity and lift (popularly known as the ‘Bird Cage Lift”) to Raj Bhavan. The tiny ornamentally designed  “Bird Cage Lift” operates to this day.

The Raj Bhavan covers an area of 84,000 sq. ft. and is surrounded by a compound covering an area of 27 acres. The Raj Bhavan has 6 gate ways one each on North & South and 2 each on East & West. The 4 gates on the East & West have a grand arch ways topped with a lion. The minor archways on the side are topped with Sphinx. Sadly these 4 colossal gates hardly provide a good view of the Raj Bhavan.

One of the four Arched Gateways of Raj Bhavan, Calcutta (Kolkata)

The best view of the Raj Bhavan is obtained from the North Gate, which also serves as the main gate. A long walk past a decorated Chinese cannon leads to a flight of stairs to the portico crowned with the triangular pediment supported by six ionic pillars.

The Chinese cannon, mounted on a dragon and flanked with minor cannons, was brought from Nanking in 1842. An inscription on a marble plaque reads “The peace dictated to the Emperor of China under the walls of Nanking by the military force of England and of India.” The South gate also provides a grand view, with the tree lined drive leading on to the lofty ionic pillars supporting the huge metallic dome. Entry inside the complex is strictly prohibited but photography is allowed from outside the gates with permission of the officer in charge at the gate.

North Gate, Raj Bhavan, Calcutta (Kolkata)

References:

  • An Artist’s Impression by Desmond Doig
  • Swasat Kolkata by Nishitranjan Roy
  • 10 Walks in Calcutta by Prosenjit Dasgupta
  • Jaywalkers Guide Calcutta by Soumitra Das
  • White Mughal by William Dalrymple

Chinese Cannon, Raj Bhavan, Calcutta (Kolkata)

List of my Blog entries on Calcutta (Kolkata)

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,138 other followers